Photos

Kangaroos_at_Belconnen_Naval_Transmitting_Station

EGK_Fertility_Control

Fertility_Control

Some eastern grey kangaroos at the Belconnen Naval Transmitting Station have been vaccinated with one of three experimental fertility control treatments or corresponding inactive treatments. The research kangaroos, including all the adults in these photos, are identified with eartags or collars. Some unmarked kangaroos are also at the site.

 

Measuring and Vacinating Measuring and vaccinating anaesthetised kangaroos during fertility control research in May 2007.
blindfolded_kangaroo A lycra blindfold is placed on the capture-darted kangaroo to protect its eyes, which otherwise remain open with the types of anaesthetic most often used for kangaroo capture. The blindfold seems to also deepen the level of sedation. A rolled sack is used to elevate its shoulders and promote drainage away from the airways of unconscious animals.
Fitting_ID_Collar Researcher fitting an identification collar made from soft upholstery material. For comfort, these collars are fitted with four fingers and part of the hand inside. Researchers ensure collars are not excessively loose as this could be a danger to the kangaroo.
tagging_kangaroos The generator shed at Belconnen Naval Transmitting Station being used for kangaroo research. The outlines on the tarpaulin mark the location of insulated pads where a kangaroo can be placed. In 2008, after being mustered, yarded and darted by Defence contractors, all of the tagged research kangaroos were processed here in a few days, up to ten animals at a time.
recovery_period While recovering from injected general anaesthetics such as those used for capture-darting, kangaroos have impaired vision, balance and coordination, and are vulnerable to being prematurely roused by noise, especially voices. This young male has moved away from the insulated pad on which he was left, and has removed his blindfold (dark object in front of kangaroo). His droopy stance and protruding tongue tell researchers he will need another half an hour before he is able to hop properly. When kangaroos are recovering from anaesthesia, people should remain at a distance and keep quiet.

  Return to Kangaroo Research Projects being conducted in the ACT.